Author - Sri Lanka Archaeology

SAARC Photographic Competition and Exhibition

Theme : Historical Sites/Natural Landscape in the SAARC Region

Background

flyer_final-01Today, photography has become an art by itself, with many modern advances to photography. The SAARC Cultural Centre hopes to encourage photographers in the SAARC Region, by having a competition of Photographs of 1) Historical Sites in the SAARC Region 2) Natural Landscape in the SAARC Region.

The best photographs will be on Exhibition in Colombo, Sri Lanka. A cash award and certificate, recognizing the best in the two categories will be given to the best three, and short listed photographs will be showcased at the exhibition, and on all publications pertaining to the competition. This is an attempt to promote the SAARC Region to the rest of the world. A virtual exhibition will also be uploaded on the SAARC Cultural Centre website, to increase outreach. The competition would be the first of its kind to the SAARC Region, and will be continued on an annual basis.

All SAARC Member States-Relevant Ministries are kindly requested to circulate to all relevant institutions and interested parties.

1. Dates and Venue

The Deadline for submission of photographs will be the 31st of October 2013. Winners and selected photographs will be announced by end November 2013. The Exhibition will take place in December together with an award Ceremony.

2. Guidelines for submitting Photographs

  • The competition is open to anyone who is a citizen of one of the SAARC Member States.
  • Each entrant may submit a maximum of five (5) images in each category.
  • Images under the theme of 1) Historical Sites in the SAARC Region and 2) Natural Landscape in the SAARC Region can be submitted for the competition.
  • Each picture must be submitted with the following details

– A title and a description of the picture separately, which should name the Historical Site/ Natural Landscape, the name of the SAARC country it is situated in, and a short description of the picture
– The name of the photographer/ the country he or she belongs to/ the date the picture was taken.
– A declaration regarding the originality of the photograph
(Please refer prescribed form. The form should be duly filled, signed and submitted as a PDF together with the entries)
Colour and Black/white images are acceptable
– Image Specifications
– Image Adjustments
– Some adjustment or editing is allowed
– Adjustments that are allowed
– Adjustments that are NOT allowed

  • Freshness, originality, creativity and innovation are central to the competition, and should be reflected in all images that are submitted.
  • All photographs should initially be mailed to sccphotocomp@gmail.com on or before the 31st of October in keeping with the above guidelines.

3. Terms and Conditions

Applicants are responsible for ensuring full compliance with any national or international legislation, for example in the case of heritage sites, governing the country in which the image has been taken and in securing any relevant permits that may be required and which should be made available for inspection on request by the Centre.
Caption information supplied must be complete, true and accurate.
Each entry must be the original work of the entrant and must not infringe the rights of any other party.
The copyright in all images submitted to the Competition will remain with the copyright holder who will be credited as follows: ©photographer’s name.
By entering the Competition, each entrant grants to the SAARC Cultural Centre, a non-exclusive irrevocable license to reproduce, publish and communicate to the public by any means and exhibit their selected/awarded image(s) and copies of their awarded image(s) in all media throughout the world in relation to the Competition and the Exhibition including but not limited to all use in the context of:
a. Display at the Awards Ceremony
b. Display in the Exhibition
c. Inclusion in the brochure or Magazine/Calendar or similar publications
d. Inclusion within the SAARC Cultural Centre Websites, including within interactive elements associated with the Competition and/or Exhibition (now known or hereafter created) available for viewing or download from the SCC Websites
e. Inclusion in promotional, press materials relating to the Competition and/or Exhibition
Awarded images may be used by the Centre for the purposes of the Competition and/or Exhibition from the date of notification of awarded images until the end of the Exhibition and thereafter the Centre may keep the awarded images within an archive (electronic or otherwise).

4. Deadline for Submission

The deadline for submission is the 31st of October 2013.
All photographs should initially be mailed to sccphotocomp@gmail.com or before the 31st of October in keeping with the above guidelines.
All entries should be submitted together with a signed prescribed form attached herewith.

Application Form

Source: SAARC Cultural Center

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International Conference on Asian Art, Culture and Heritage 21st – 23rd August 2013 Programme

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International Conference on Asian Art, Culture and Heritage

 21st – 23rd August 2013

Programme

Download Programme as a PDF

21st August 2013

9.30 am                       Inauguration Ceremony

10.30 am                      Conferring of ten memorial awards by the IAAH

11.30 am                     Refreshments

12.00 pm                     Keynote Address

1.00 pm                       Lunch

2.00 – 5.30 pm            Academic Sessions (Day 1)

7.00 pm                       Cultural Show

 

22nd August

9.00 am – 3.00 pm      Academic Sessions (Day 2)

4.00 pm                       Valedictory Function

23rd August                Conference Tour to Galle( For Foreign delegates)

 

Inauguration 21st August 2013

9.30 am-9.40 am                        Lighting of the Traditional Oil Lamp

9.40 am – 9.50 am                      Welcome Address – Prof . Anura Manatunga, Director, Centre for Asian Studies

9.50 am -10.00 am                     Address by Prof. Ranjith Bandara, Chairman, Sri Lanka Foundation

10.00 am – 10.10 am                  Launching of Conference Publications

10.10 am – 10.20 am                  Address by Prof. Sarath Amunugama, Vice Chancellor, University of Kelaniya

10.20. am – 10.30 am                 Address by Mr. Wasantha Ekanayaka, Secretary, Ministry of Culture and the Arts

10.30 am – 11.00 am                  Conferring Ten Memorial Awards by the IAAH

11.00 am – 11.10 am                  Address by Hon. Dr. Jagath Balasuriya, Minister of National Heritage

11. 10am – 11.20 am                  Address by Hon. Mr. T.B. Ekanayaka, Minister of Culture and the Arts

11.20. am -11. 25 am                 Vote of Thanks

11.25 am – 11.30 am                  National Anthem

11.30. am. -12.00 pm                 Refreshments

12.00 pm- 1.00 pm                     Keynote Speech by Prof. Manique Gunasekere, Dean Faculty of Graduate Studies,  University of Kelaniya

1.00 pm  – 2. 00pm                    Lunch

21st August 2013- Academic Session 1

Bio-Diversity, Physical Anthropology, Ethnography, Prehistory and Environmental Archaeology

Venue: Lecture Hall 1

Session: 1.1: 2.00 – 3.30 pm

Chairperson: Dr. S. U. Deraniyagala

Rapporteur : Dr. Lanka Ranaweera

 

Tim

Title

2.00 – 2.15 pm

 The Rathnapura Fauna of Sri Lanka and its Affinities with other South and South East Asian Faunal Elements

 G.L. Badam 2.15 – 2.30 pm

 Unique Mesolithic Creations from Animal Remains in Sri Lanka

Kelum Nalinda Manamendra-Arachchi, K.H. Sonali Rangika Premarathne, Gamini Adikari2.30 – 2.45pm

 Need for Creating Inventory of Human Skeletal Findings from Archaeological Context

Veena Mushrif-Tripathy2.45 – 3.00 pm

 Non-Metric Dental Trait Variations in an Aboriginal Vedda Population of Anuradhapura, North Central Province of Sri Lanka 

Jayaweera J.A.A, Peiris H.R.D, Arambawatta A.K.S, Nanayakkara C.D 3.00 – 3.15pm

 Roopkund Mystery “Pathology Reveals Head Injury Behind the Casualties”

Alka Barthwal Pant,  SR Walimbe,  RS Negi

 3.15 – 3.30 pm  Discussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

            3.30 pm           TEA BREAK

21st August 2013

Session 1.2: 4.00 – 5.30 pm

Chairperson : Dr. T. R. Premathilake

Rapporteur   : Dr. Chulani Rambukwella

 

Time

Title

4.00 – 4.15 pm Local Landraces of Rice from Sri Lanka      Mayuri Munasinghe

 4.15-4.30 pmEthnoarchaeological Study of Jhum Cultivation Among the Chakhesang Tribe of Nagaland

Nutazo Lohe

 4.30-4.45 pmEnvironmental Archaeology of Sri Lanka: A Site Catchment Analysis      

D.K. Jayarathne4.45-5.00 pmUse of Bamboo Shoots Among the Galo Tribe of Arunachal Pradesh                     

Bina Gandhi Deori

 5.00-5.15 pmAn Ethnographic Documentation of the Subsistence Pattern of The Paniyar Tribes of Wayanad, Kerala

S. Urmila

 5.15 – 5.30pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

Academic Session 2

Historical Archaeology, Art History and Ancient Architecture

Venue: Lecture Hall 2

21st August 2013

Session: 2.1: 2.00 – 3.30 pm

Chairperson:  Dr. Pushpa Tiwari

 Rapporteur : Dr. Rose Solangaarachchi

 

Time

Title

2.00 – 2.15 pm

 Preliminarily Investigation of the Sri Lankan Copper-Based Statues of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

K.A. Anusha Kasthuri

 2.15 – 2.30 pm

 Influence of Nalanda Bronzes on the Art of Neighbouring Countries 

     Dilip Kumar

 2.30 – 2.45pm

 Aspects of Sri Lanka’s Footprints of the Buddha                     

Kayoko Kusumoto

 2.45 – 3.00 pm

 An Investigation into Objective of Buddhist Art

R.G.D Jayawardena3.00 – 3.15pm

 Documentation of the Buddhist Cultural Heritage of District Shangla, Pakistan

Ghani-ur-Rahman3.15 – 3.30 pm 

 Discussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

            3.30 PM     TEA BREAK

21st August 2013

Session 2.2: 4.00 – 5.30 pm

Chairperson : Prof. Jagath Weerasinghe

Rapporteur : Dr. Vinay Kumar

 

 

Time

Title

4.00 – 4.15 pm Historical Archaeology: Recent Discovery of Some Important Temple Remains in Yamunapar Region of Allahabad District

Pushpa Tiwari 

 4.15 – 4.30 pmA Unique “Yaksha” Sculpture at “Manikdurg” Fort Maharashtra, India

Shivendra Kadgaonkar, Sachin Vidyadhar Joshi, Abhijit Dandekar

 4.30 – 4.45 pmThe Variants of the Elephant Motif in Sri Lankan Art: A Survey from the Sixth Century B.C. to the Nineteenth Century

Anuththaradevi Widyalankara

 4.45 – 5.00 pmPatronage, Composition and Iconography in Rock – Cut Temples at Badami and Aihole

Niharika Sankrityayan

 5.00 – 5.15 pmArt and Architecture of Vishnu Temple at Janjgir

Vishi Upadhyay, Shivi Upadhyay, Bharti Shroti

 5.15 – 5.30 pm Discussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

Academic Session 3

Language, Literature and Society

Venue: Lecture Hall 3

21st August 2013

Session: 3.1: 2.00 – 3.30 pm

Chairperson: Prof. Sunanda Mahendra

Rapporteur : Dr. Bandana Mukhopadhyay Bhattacharya

 

 

Time

Title

2.00 – 2.15 pm Patterning Storytelling- Oral Traditions and History in Modern Animation Media in India

      Lopamudra Maitra

 2.15 – 2.30 pmMahavamsa as a Meta Narrative                

Desmond Mallikarachchi

 2.30 – 2.45 pmJaffna Tamil Society as Represented in the Stories of Alagu Subramaniam

Sivagowri Sivagurunathan Rajashanthan

 2.45 – 3.00 pmEarly Translations of the Bible into Malayalam: The Poetics and the Politics  R.K.Jayasree3.00 – 3.15 pmNew Regimes and Old Structures: An Analysis of Ideological Shifts and Strategies of Change in Raja Rao’s Kanthapura

Thilini Meegaswatta

 3.15 – 3.30 pm Discussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

            3.30 PM                      TEA BREAK

21st August 2013

Session 3.2: 4.00 – 5.30 pm

Chairperson : Prof. K.D. Paranavitana

Rapporteur : Dr. Janaki Jayawardhane

 

 

Time

Title

4.00 – 4.15 pm Sri Lanka: the Colonial in the Postcolonial      Buddhini Wijesuriya

 4.15 – 4.30 pmA Historical Study of the Position of Women from 13th Century A. D. to the End of the 15th Century

N. A. Wimalasena

 4.30 – 4.45 pmReligion and Politics as projected in the Mahabharata             

Supriya Banik Pal 

 4.45 – 5.00 pmDancing Bodies Through Centuries: – Analyzing Devadasis Roles as Representatives of Changes

S. Jeevanandam

 5.00 – 5.15 pmIndigenous Characteristics of Dance in Anuradhapura Period

Koshalee Kakulandala

 5.15 – 5.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

Academic Session 4

Religious Studies

Venue: Lecture Hall 4

21st August 2013

Session: 4.1: 2.00 – 4.00 pm

Chairperson: Prof. Oliver Abeynayake

Rapporteur : Ms. Uma Bodas

 

Time

Title

2.00 – 2.15 pm What is a World?  Indigeneity, Regionalism and the Vernacular in Nagarjun

Toral Gajarawala

 2.15 – 2.30 pmPerformative Aesthetics and the Cultural Turn of Religion in India              

Saayan Chattopadhyay

 2.30 – 2.45 pmStudies in Religion, Language and Literature      Ven. Bhikkhuni Anula Devi

 2.45 – 3.00 pmThe Nath Cult  in Sri Lanka                              Bachchan Kumar

 3.00 – 3.15 pmThe Enigma of Tara Cult : An Ethnoarchaeological Study of Eastern India      Elora Tribedy

 3.15 – 3.30 pm Discussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

            3.30 PM                      TEA BREAK

 

21st August 2013

Session 4.2: 4.00 – 5.30 pm

Chairperson : Prof. S. Padmanathan

Rapporteur : Dr. Toral Gajarawala

 

Time

Title

4.00 – 4.15 pm The Trajectory of Culture of Human Rights and Civil Liberty in Hinduism        

N.K.Kumaresan Raja

 4.15 – 4.30 pmMusical Instruments in Hindu Traditional Life      Narayanan Mallikadevi

 4.30 – 4.45 pmA Critical Study of Saivism in India                                                    Gayathri Karthikeyan

 4.45 – 5.00 pmGoddess Shri Tuljabhawani : Kinds of Woships      Satish Kadam

 5.00 – 5.15 pmBuddhist Symbolism: Its Impact on Trans-Himalayan Art, Culture and Society                   

Morup Dorjay

 5.15 – 5.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAY 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22nd August 2013 – Academic Session 1

Venue: Lecture Hall 1

Session 1.3: 9.00 – 10.30 am

Chairperson: Dr. Roland Silva

Rapporteur : Arct. Prasanna Rathnayaka

 

Time

Title

9.00 – 9.15 am The Curious Case of the Lepchas: One-Man Mission for Heritage Management of a Vanishing Tribe in Kalimpong in the Eastern Himalayas

Maitreyee Choudhury

 9.15 – 9.30 amA Call to Align the Management of Sri Lanka’s Heritage Sites with Ancient Cultural Values and UNESCO Policy

Wolfgang Dittus & Sunil Gunathilake9.30 – 9.45 amIf Pots Could Speak: Technological Studies of Pre-historic Pottery from Pañr       

Prerana Srimaal

 9.45 – 10.00 amHeritage Marketing and Historical Re-enactment: A case study of Delhi    

Milisa Srivastava10.00 – 10.15 amUnderwater Archaeological Impact Assessment of the Colombo Port City, Sri Lanka

Amalka Wijesuriya, Palitha Weerasinghe, Sanath Karunaratne, Pradeep Tennegedara

 10.15 – 10.30 amDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

10.30 am         TEA BREAK

22nd August 2013

Session 1.4: 11.00am – 12.30pm

Chairperson: Prof. N.K. Dangalla

Rapporteur : Ms. Melathi Saldin

 

Time

Title

11.00 – 11.15 am Heritage Management as a Tool for Educating Tribal Communities of India to Realize Their Identity

Vinay Kumar

 11.15 – 11.30 amHousehold Archaeology: A Theoretical Perspective                                        

Astha Dibyopama & Anura Manatunga

 11.30 am – 11.45 am‘Sited’ Movements in the Landscape: Preliminary Findings from an Archaeological Survey of Saru Maru Buddhist Stupa and Monastic Complex, Madhya Pradesh, India

L. Lamminthang Simte

 11.45 am – 12.00 noonTourism and Transition: An Understanding of Authenticity and Commodification of Culture in the Context of Ladakh (India)

Tashi Lundup

 12.00 noon – 12.15 pmA Study on Impacts of Unplanned Tourism Development in the Negombo Tourism Hub

Indrachapa Gunasekara

 12.15 – 12.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

12. 30 – 2.00 pm         LUNCH BREAK

 

22nd August 2013

Session: 1.5: 2.00 – 3.30 pm

Chairperson:  Prof. Ranitha Rathnayaka

 Rapporteur : Dr. Arjuna Tanthilage

 

 

Time

Title

2.00 – 2.15 pm Cognitive Map: An Alternative Tool to View Cultural Information                       

Pratapanand Jha

 2.15 – 2.30 pmStudy of Using 3D Models in Sri Lankan Archaeological Sites                         

M.V.M. Jayathilake & P.H.A.B. Shantha

 2.30 – 2.45 pmGIS Method: Approaches to Define Landscapes and Settlement Choice in South India During the Neolithic Period                                          

Opangtula Imsong

 2.45 – 3.00 pmDiminishing or Vanishing Cultures in Sri Lanka                       

Subathini Ramesh                                                                                                              

 3.00 – 3.15 pmThe Operation System of the Ancient Irrigation System in the Dry and Proximity Zone: A Study of Ancient Canals in Sri Lanka

Chandana Rohana Withanachchi

 3.15 – 3.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

3.30 pm      TEA BREAK

 

22nd August 2013

Session 1.6: 4.00 – 5.30pm

Chairperson : Prof. Daya Edirisinghe

Rapporteur :Dr. Lopamudra Maitra

 

Time

Title

4.00 – 4.15 pm Revealing Antiquities from Kolhua (Early Vaishali)

Badar Ara

 4.15 – 4.30 pmConservation of Urban Heritage, Tourism and Living Communities: A Study of Planning Policy and Social Exclusion in Agra (India)

Kapil Kumar Gavsker 4.30 – 4.45 pmOwin: A Lost and Ruined Fortress and Defense Watch Tower in Kashmir at the Edge of Punjab, Pakistan

Samina Saleem

 4.45 – 5.00 pmPatola – The  Mystery  Craft : A  Case  Study  of  the  Salvi  Community of  the  Patan,  Western  India

Sanghamitra Rai Verman

 5.00 – 5.15 pmIron : From Antiquity to Culture                      Saravanan, R.

 5.15 – 5.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

Academic Session 2

Heritage, Museums and Tourism

Venue: Lecture Hall 2

22nd August 2013

Session 2.3: 9.00 – 10.30 am

Chairperson: Mr. Sirinimal Lakdusinghe

Rapporteur : Dr. Anuththaradevi Widyalankara

 

 Time

Title

9.00 – 9.15 am The Role of Museums in Cultural and Heritage Tourism for Sustainable Economy in Developing Countries

Kamani Perera9.15 – 9.30 amThe Role of Sanskriti Museums: Popularizing of Terracotta, Textiles, and      Everyday Art and Crafts

Nidhi Saryal9.30 – 9.45 am

Museums in Sri Lanka: from the Colombo Museum to the Colombo National  Museum and Beyond

Chulani Rambukwella

9.45 – 10.00 amConceptualising Religious Repositories and Communities into Living Museums: 120  Beyond Aspects and Perspectives

Abantika Parashar & Mrinmoy Das10.00 – 10.15 amThe Significance of Colombo Dutch Museum as a Tourist Attraction 

K. Anupama Damunupola10.15 – 10.30 amDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

          10.30 AM        TEA BREAK

22nd August 2013

Session 2.4: 11.00am – 12.30pm

Chairperson: Prof. Chandra Wickramagamage

Rapporteur : Ms. Kayako Kusumoto

 

Time

Title

11.00 – 11.15 am Sinhala Buddha Images and Political Legitimation in Southeast Asia

Hema Goonatilake

 11.15 – 11.30 amHindustani Influences in the Architecture of South-West Asia

Iván Szántó11.30 am – 11.45 amThe Seductress and Ascetic: Two Female Archetypes in the Traditional Murals

Asoka de Zoysa

 11.45 am – 12.00 noonRaktamrittika Mahavihara (chiruti) – a Newly Discovered Buddhist Site in Murshidabad, West Bengal, India

Bela Bhattacharya &  Ahana Bhattacharya

 12.00 noon – 12.15 pmWhat’s in a Name? Capitalizing 18th & 19th Centuries’ Buddhist Murals of Sri Lanka

Jagath Weerasinghe

 12.15 – 12.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

12.30 – 2.00 PM         LUNCH BREAK

 

 

 

22nd August 2013

Session 2.5: 2.00 – 4.00 pm

Chairperson : Dr. Nirmal Ranjith Dewasiri

Rapporteur :  Ms. Sivagowri Rajashanthan

 

Time

Title

2.00 – 2.15 pm Spectrum of Culture & Heritage Reflected Areas in India                                           Jayaram Gollapudi &  N.R.Giridhar

 2.15 – 2.30 pmNewly Discovered Rock Art Sites in North Karnataka, India                             

Mohana R

 2.30 – 2.45 pmThe Aesthetic of Painting in the Visnudharmottarapurana                 

Reeta Bhattacharya

 2.45 – 3.00 pmThe Archaeological Evidences on A Hospital in The Ruins of Mihintale        

Nadeesha Gunawardana

 3.00 – 3.15 pmRemnants of Chola Art from Sri Lanka          Swati Raikhy

 3.15 – 3.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

           

3.30 PM          TEA BREAK

 

22nd August 2013

Session 2.6: 4.00 – 5.30 pm

Chairperson : Dr. Mala Malla

Rapporteur : Dr. Dilip Kumar

 

 

Time

Title

4.00 – 4.15 pm Art and Architecture in the Asokan Inscription      Suchitra Ray Acharyya

 4.15 – 4.30 pmCultural Landscape in Ancient Southern Anuradhapura

Thusitha Mendis

 4.30 – 4.45 pmThe Role of Iconographic Terminology in Documentation of Indian Sculptures

Indra Vats

 4.45 – 5.00 pm

Representation of Picturesque Paradise – CaseStudy of Sri Lanka

Priyantha Udagedara

 

5.00 – 5.15 pmSome Observations on Dutch Leprosy Hospital Complex in Sri Lanka                     

Sānā Medhāli Ranasinghe

 5.15 – 5.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

 

 

Session 3

Literary Heritage, Intangible Culture and Gender

22nd August 2013

Session 3.3: 9.00 – 10.45 am

Chairperson: Prof. Manique Gunasekere

Rapporteur :  Mr. Axel Diaz Maimone

 

 

 Time

Title

9.00 – 9.15 am Charıty: A Parsı Constructıon of “Good Thought, Good Words and Good Deeds”

Kreeti Goswami

 9.15 – 9.30 amA Critical Discourse Analytical Approach to Interpretation of Heteroglossic                                                        42 Situations in Fiction

EA Gamini Fonseka9.30 – 9.45 amInterpretation of  the Word “Sālakaañkata”

Radhika S. Adivarekar

 9.45 – 10.00 amCultural Aspect of Printing Press in Bengal: A Case Study of Serampore Mission and Indigenous Responses

Amrita Mondal10.00 – 10.15 amA Critical Study of the Metre and Rhetoric of Mànàvulusandesaya

Ven. Moragollagama Uparathana

 10.15 – 10.30 amDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

          10.30 AM        TEA BREAK

 

22nd August 2013

Session 3.4: 11.00am – 12.30pm

Chairperson: Prof. K.N.O. Dharmadasa

Rapporteur :Dr. Amrita Mondal

 

 

 

Time

Title

11.00 – 11.15 am Festivals Celebrated by Newaras of Kathmandu Valley                                    

Mala Malla

 11.15 – 11.30 amRabindranath Tagore and Victoria Ocampo       Axel Díaz Maimone

 11.30 am – 11.45 amMixed Language in the Print and Electronic Media in Sri Lanka  

Chamindi Dilkushi Senaratne Wettewe

 11.45 am – 12.00 noonStudy of Words ‘duhkha’ and ‘kaa’      

Madhavi S. Godbole12.00 noon – 12.15 pmSanskritization of the English Lexicon: the Influence of Sanskrit on the Word-stock of the English Language

Rusiru Kalpagee Chitrasena

 12.15 – 12.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

12.30 – 2.00 PM         LUNCH BREAK

22nd August 2013

Session 3. 5: 2.00 – 4.00 pm

Chairperson : Prof. Maithree Wickramasinghe

Rapporteur : Dr. Indika Bulankulame

 

Time

Title

2.00 – 2.15 pm Women in Kuṭṭanmata: Courtesan and Wife in the Socio-Cultural Context  

Joyshree Nath

 2.15 – 2.30 pmRewarding the Female Compliance Through Fairy Tales Vs Encouraging Female Potential Through the Life Stories of Buddhist Lay Women

T.M.W.P.Tennakoon2.30 – 2.45 pmCoir work and the Rural Women- A Study of a Traditional Craft and Home Industry of Bengal, India

Rokaiya Begum

 2.45 – 3.00 pmAn Analysis of Ancient Sri Lankan Female Clothing Details Depicted from Selected Sculptures from the Anuradhapura Period to the End of the 19th Century

Ayesha Wickramasinghe3.00 – 3.15 pmThe Mat Weavers of Henawala: Integrating a ‘Feudal” Craft to the 21st  Century

Ninel Fernando3.15 – 3.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

                        3.30 PM          TEA BREAK

 

22nd August 2013

Session 3.6: 4.00 – 5.30 pm

Chairperson : Dr. K.D.G. Wimalarathne

Rapporteur : Dr. Dilkushi Wettewa

 

Time

Title

4.00 – 4.15 pm The Usage of Art and Traditional Sinhala ‘Serasili’ for the Surface Decoration of Earthenware Clay Vessels in Sri Lanka

W.M.N.D. Ranasinghe

 4.15 – 4.30 pmNational Heritage and Ethnic Problem in Sri Lanka                        

Ven. Uduwila Uparathana

 4.30 – 4.45 pmFashion Traditions: Reading the Hybridization of Dress in Sri Lanka           

Priyanka Virajini Medagedara Karunaratne

 4.45 – 5.00 pmArtistic Craft and the Craftsmen of Bengal

Sekh Rahim Mondal

 5.00 – 5.15 pmCulture and Fashion                               Gayathri Madubhani Ranatunga

 5.15 – 5.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

 

Session 4

 

Rituals, Beliefs and Spiritual Wellbeing

22nd August 2013

Session 4.3: 9.00 – 10.30 am

Chairperson: Dr. Hema Goonatilake

Rapporteur : Dr. Satish Kadam

 

 Time

Title

9.00 – 9.15 am Management Thought  in Sanskrit Literature      Uma Bodas
9.15 – 9.30 am Critical Studies of Buddhist Biomedical Literary Ethics and its Application in Modern Society

Bandana Mukhopadhyay (Bhattacharya)

 9.30 – 9.45 amIdiosyncratic Wordings in the Mahavagga-Paḷi:  A Critical and Historical Scrutiny

Aruna K. Gamage

 9.45 – 10.00 amModern Concept of Ethics and Morality behind Ancient Indian Puranic Tales

Shiuli Basu

10.00 – 10.15 amComparative Study of Pacceka Buddhas of MN and Former Leaders of Jainism

S.Vijitha Kumara

 10.15 – 10.30 amDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

          10.30 AM        TEA BREAK

22nd August 2013

Session 4.4: 11.00am – 12.30pm

Chairperson: Prof. Asanga Thilakarathne

Rapporteur : Dr. Morup Dorjay

 

Time

Title

11.00 – 11.15 am An Exposition of the Cognitive, Behavioural and Psychotherapeutic Aspects of the Sevenfold Purity 

R. M. Rathnasiri

 11.15 – 11.30 amDeul Temple: Initial of Pandvas of Dakshina Kosala           

Shivi Upadhyay Joshi, Vishi Upadhyay

 11.30 am – 11.45 amThe Portuguese and Menikkadawara                                                                                                 Dhanushka Kumara Jayaratne11.45 am – 12.00 noonRituals and Beliefs of the Nawagamuwa Paththini Dewalaya              

Piyumi Embuldeniya

 12.00 noon – 12.15 pmLocating the Importance of Yogini  Temples of Odisha

Koumudi Malladi

 12.15 – 12.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

12.30 – 2.00 PM         LUNCH BREAK

 

 

 

22nd August 2013

Session 4.5  : 2.00 – 3.00 pm

Chairperson : Dr. Sandagomi Coperahewa

Rapporteur : Dr. Prashantha Perera

 

Time

Title

2.00 – 2.15 pm Tibetan Buddhist Literature: Traces, Transmission and Translation

Padma Tsomo

 2.15 – 2.30 pmMaterial culture of Death, Grief and Memory: A Case Study     

Thilanka Manoj Siriwardana

 

 2.30 – 2.45 pmLegal issues regarding archaeological sites used for religious purposes

     Prashantha Lal de Alwis

 2.45 – 3.00 pmHistory and Collection of Carpets in India Md. Ali Nasir

 3.00 – 3.15 pmSir James de Alwis and his contribution to Sinhalese literature

     Chinthaka Ranasinghe3.15-3.30 pmDiscussion and Chairperson’s Remarks

3.30-4.00 PM TEA BREAK

22nd August 2013 Valedictory Function

6.00 pm – 7.00 pm      Chairperson:  Prof. Sarath Amunugama,

,

Co-chairpersons:

 Prof. G. L. Badam, Deccan College Postgraduate and Research Institute, Pune

Prof. A.H.M.H. Abayarathna, Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Kelaniya

Prof. Gamini Adikari, Director General, Central Cultural Fund

Dr. Senarath Dissanayake, Director-General, Department of Archaeology

 Short Speeches by participants

Distribution of gifts and certificates

Vote of Thanks – Dr. Pushpa Kulanatha, Senior Lecturer, Institute of Indigenous Medicine, University of Colombo

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New Maritime Archaeological discoveries in Eastern Province in Sri Lanka: With special emphasis on Trincomale to Potuvil

AMA Dayananda and Mahinda Karunarathna, Maritime Archaeology Unit, Central Cultural Fund

Maritime Archaeology Unit (MAU) of Central Cultural Fund (CCF) is carried out an underwater Archaeological non disturbance exploration in the Eastern coastal area (From Trincomalee to Potuvill), 13th of July to 26th of August 2013. Drawing the measured and non measured drawings, photographical and video documentation, applying GPS and remote sensing are the used methods for the exploration.Trincomalee, Batticaloa and Pothuwil are the main selected areas for the survey.

MAU team discovered 16 shipwrecks and other 4 maritime archaeological sites after the survey. Irakkandi wreck at Nialwei, HMS   Diamade wreck at Uppuveli, Trincomalee, Lady Maculum wreck, British Sargent wreck, Pasikuda Iron wreck, Pasikuda Boilaer wreck I & II , Baticaloa Boiler wreck, SS Brunus wreck (Sakkara kappal/ Gragery Wreck),  Kalmune Boiler wreck at baticaloa and Akkaraipattu Boiler wreck, Tirkkovil Boiler wreck, Tirkkovil Iron wreck, Komari Boiler wreck, Omari Boiler wreck at Potuvare uncovered by the survey. The underwater archaeological site at Swami rock at Trincomalee, ancient stone bridge at Mayankerni, old Dutch jetty at, Pasikuda and Buddhist underwater archaeology site at Potuvil are explored and unearthed new information on underwater Archaeology.

History of the wrecks are going back to the Dutch  and British period of Sri Lanka and unearthed all wrecks are sunk in colonized era of Sri Lanka. Most of the wrecks are boiler wreck that built by the iron. An metal anchor and man made stone blocks are found from swami rock and Bow sections, stern , propeller and shaft, boilers, anchors are found from the wreck sites. Most of the wrecks are distorted by the treasure hunters .

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archaeology.lk interviews Dr. Karen Lee from the Smithsonian

Pramuditha Munusinghe from archaeology.lk interviews Dr. Karen Lee, a curator from the Smithsonian, the world’s largest museum and research complex based in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Lee express her views on modern museums, how they should change for the future and collections in Sri Lanka museums.

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Former Commissioner of Archaeology Dr. Saddhamangala Karunarathna Passed away today

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Dr. Saddhamangala Karunarathna, former Commissioner of Archaeology(1979 - 1983)

Dr. Saddhamangala Karunarathna, former Commissioner of Archaeology(1979 – 1983)

Dr. Saddhamangala Karunarathna, former Commissioner of Archaeology(1979 – 1983) passed away today.

Dr. Saddhamangala Karunaratne graduated in 1946 from the University of Ceylon and in 1949 he obtained his M. A. specialising in Pali. In 1950 he joined the Department of Archaeology as an Assistant Commissioner.
This was in the heyday of the Department of Archaeology, with Dr. Senarat Paranavitana, an outstanding an eminent scholar historian and epigraphist as Commissioner Dr. Karunaratne had the good fortune of having his training in epigraphy under Dr. Pranavitana and later he went on to Cambridge where he got his Ph.D.
His thesis for the Ph.D. was ‘The Brahmi Inscriptions of Ceylon’. This research work was under the supervision of Dr. K. R. Norman, Professor of Indian studies at the University of Cambridge.In 1979, Dr. Karunaratne was appointed to the post of Archaeological Commissioner, which position he held till 1983. The results of his research on the Brahmi inscriptions are published as a special volume (JII) of the Epigraphia Zaylanica, the prestigious epigraphical volume started in 1905 by Dr. D. M. de Z. Wickramasinghe.
May he attain nibbana!
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A Gemological Perspective of Gem Beads of Jetavana World Heritage Site, Sri Lanka

Pathmakumara Jayasingha – Research Scientist / Geologist, Research Laboratary, Central Cultural Fund, Sri Lanka. ( jpathma@yahoo.com )
(This was first published in Archaeologia, Part 2, Volume 1, April 2011)

Introduction

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Some natural and synthetic beads of Jethawanaya bead collection

Beads were used as bodily ornaments by ancient people. Bead making is an art and a variety of materials like stones, gems, corals, shells, amber, wood, metals etc have been used since prehistoric time (Dubin 1987). The use of natural materials varied from region to region, country to country and place to place. Later the bead making process has been developed as an industry with better knowledge and advanced technology that created synthetic beads and properly faceted natural beads. After the beginning of long distance trade, knowledge and techniques of bead making were circulated and different kinds of materials and beads were distributed around the world. As a centre for trading in ancient times, Sri Lankan culture was enhanced and gained different techniques, materials and beads from different countries. Sri Lanka is rich in raw materials for making either natural or synthetic beads.

Ancient chronicles of Sri Lanka have mentioned the use of gems as decorative materials from ancient times (Mahavamsa 300 AD, Thupavamsa 300-600 AD). Gems, are minerals which have specific characteristics. Beauty defined by its colour, degree of transparency, lustre, reflective effect, rarity and durability of a gemstone decide the class of a gemstone, indicating if it is either precious or semiprecious. The main gem varieties found in Sri Lanka are Corundum, Chrysoberyl, Zircon, Garnet, Tourmaline, Beryl, Moonstone, Topaz and Quartz family. Sri Lankan people have used gems not only to create jewellery but also to decorate royal palaces and religious places. One of the best examples is the “Pabalu Wehera” in Polonnaruva which was said to be decorated with beads. There are evidencs of using gems for making beads. In subsequent periods, beads were also manufactured synthetically.

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Garnet beads with different
shapes

Read full paper

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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

Hunugalagala is a limestone cave situated on the southern slope of the central highlands in Sri Lanka. It is a mighty rock formation that has been formed through million years ago. The surrounding area of this cave had been used by the foraging communities at least 4000 years ago. Grind-stones utilized for cereal processing and elegantly manufactured microlithic stone implements (quartz) are visible on the ground at several locations not far from the cave. Excavation in the Hunugalagala cave was initiated on 27th July 2013 and the archaeological findings are stunning. The artifacts so far unearthed include stone grind stones, painted potsherds (black lines on red background) and human/animal ? bones which are highly calcified. Hunugalagala is the only cave that has been selected for deep archaeological investigations in the history of the archaeology in Sri Lanka. The excavation team headed by Raj Somadeva (PhD), Professor in Archaeology of the Postgraduate Institute of Archaeology in the University of Kelaniya. A Physical Anthropologist and a Geologist with several amateur archaeologists are accompanying the excavation.

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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

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Urban Origins in Southern Sri Lanka – Doctoral thesis of Prof. Raj Somadewa

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Cover Page

Cover Page

Somadeva, R., 2006. Urban Origins in Southern Sri Lanka. Studies in Global Archaeology 3. Uppsala, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, 436 pp., 9 diagrams, 18 maps, 122 figures, 130 plates, 201 tables, 9 appendices. ISSN 1651-1255, ISBN XXXX.
This study focuses upon the development of urbanisation in southern Sri Lanka during the proto, early and late historical periods c. 900 BC onwards. The following research themes are addressed:

(a) Why did the southern semi-arid zone become a focus of urbanism?
(b) What were the morphological, spatial and chronological parameters of these developments?
(c) How did demography, resource availability, trade and craft specialisation, political organisation and ideology influence the process of urbanisation in this area?

An initial Land Unit classification using satellite imagery was conducted to provide a context for investigating socio-environmental relationships. The existing cultural landscape was mapped using systematic archaeological field surveys focussed on visible remains such as architectural features, ceramics and small finds. A time series archaeological site data set was established and the distribution of sites was compared to other parts of Sri Lanka using GIS (Geographical Information Systems). Coring and excavation of a series of trenches was used to establish the stratigraphic sequence to document the range of variation of finds and obtain samples for dating.
This study confirms the Dipavamsa and Mahavamsa historical chronicles compiled c.400-500 A.D in showing that the southern semi-arid zones of Sri Lanka have maintained a distinct socio-political character throughout Sri Lankan history. It also provides a point of reference for understanding Sri Lankan contributions to trade and urbanism in the wider Indian Ocean region.
Key words: Archaeology, Sri Lanka, Kirindi Oya, urbanism, ceramics, beads, historical archaeology, settlement archaeology, inscriptions, Land Unit classification, satellite image.

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Geological Background of Some Archaeological Sites of Sri Lanka

Itroduction

by Pathmakumara Jayasingha(Originally published in Sirinimal Lakdusinghe Felicitation Volume, published here with author’s permission)

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Sigiriya Rock Units

Different rock units of Sigiriya

Sri Lanka is well known for its richness of archaeological sites.As described in the great chronicles of Mahavamsa (300A.D.),Thupavamsa (300-600A.D.) and many others,such places are not restricted to one particular region or place and they are scattered all around the island.During the past 2500 years of written history of Sri Lanka, earth materials have been used to build up ancient cities,royal palaces and mighty irrigation systems. Not only that,tangible evidence from archaeological sites and museums confirm the extensive use of stone materials by ancient people for their day today  requirements. Scientific identification of such materials is essential to understand and interpret ancient technological developments, trade and cultural evolution.

Geological knowledge has been commonly applied in the field of archaeology for long time in a  global context (Renfrew 1976; Rapp & Hill 1998; Goudie 1987). In contrast, such geological studies on archaeological sites of Sri Lanka are quite rare, although it has only been around forty years ago from the establishment of geology in the country. As seen today,lack of interest of researchers in both fields might be the main reason for this aloofness. Insufficient geological knowledge on archaeological sites has resulted in misleading explanations and use of incorrect terminology among historians and  archaeologists.

However, it is well understood that comprehensive background knowledge on the geology of  archaeological sites is a present day major requirement. This study was carried out to fulfill that  requirement and to give a base line of information for future research and interpretations.

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The Power of Museums

Dr. Karen Lee

Dr. Karen Lee: Curator from the Smithsonian MuseumThe transcript of the public lecturer deliver by Dr. Karen Lee at the National Museum, Colombo on July 24, 2013 organized by the American Center, Sri Lanka.

We’ve come together tonight to talk about museums and their power to transform.

This word ‘transform’ is interesting–a 2-way street really– not only CAN museums transform the lives of people who visit them, but they can also fundamentally change the staff who work in them—the people who care for the collections, care for the visitors, decide which objects to display and how to interpret them.

As people who care about and for museums—we are responsible to sort of a higher calling. In 1945, UNESCO was created to advance the concept of world heritage of mankind. But before UNESCO, ancient civilizations were inherently curious about objects made by other people and began collecting, sharing and learning from them. Julius Cesar was a coin collector—well lets save the topic of coins for a later discussion but it is reassuring to know that people have always been interested in—people!

I smile looking around the room at you all— because I can see I am with friends—in English, we say “among kindred spirits”.

Thank you for this wonderful opportunity to spend some time together—I feel my life has already been transformed because of you—we have a special chance over the next couple of days to discuss and dream and create—the future of these places—museums—which  we love so much.

People who work in museums tend to be quite passionate— for good reason because it IS our passion which carries us to the future.

You can see I’m a little emotional about my subject but after thirty years of working in museums I have learned that we cannot be passive about them.

We must love them, use them and strive to exceed expectations with the work we do in them.

But museums can be complex places—we don’t all share the same opinions –and not surprisingly, nor do the visitors who walk through our doors. So how do we embrace complexity and serve the diverse needs of 21st century audiences and staff?

Well, lets look closer at people—and technology.

We live in an era of unprecedented…. Technologic….. Change — cell phones, instant messaging, digital pictures—allow us to ‘communicate’ at phenomenal speed ALL THE TIME.

Moving from books to the internet has fundamentally changed our expectations about business, academic and social interactions but more dramatically, it has actually changed the people using it.

Kids and young adults process information differently-

After nearly three generations tracking topics like ‘teens and technology” or “children and cell phone usage” researchers are seeing differences in the brains of kids who were “born” into the internet and the new communication technologies it has spawned.  These brain changes not only affect how people think, but how they interact.

For example, kids who’ve grown-up with the internet receive and process information differently. Their brains tend to automatically skim surface information with speed and exactness but they don’t go deep. Their ability to focus has been traded for fast volume-data processing.

Museums—which historically have expected patrons to “give their full attention” must begin to understand that the kids who visit today have significantly different learning styles than say, their parents or grandparents

Another case in point —Smart phones. They give us the internet in our pocket—and the excuse to stop memorizing. In his book “what the internet is doing to our brains” Nicholas Carr delves into how the internet is changing the way we read, think and remember. If we carry a gadget with us that’s always on and—-is always ready to answer a question, why do we need to remember anything? Serious debate buzzes over these topics.

And what about the new languages that have been introduced because of text messaging?

Combinations of single letters translate to entire sentences—sophisticated ideas become reflected compressed code ….but for people like me who until recently refused to use a cell phone—we’re lost in this new symbolic communication and even sometimes feel oppressed by the challenging pace of the world around us.

But this world of rapid-processing and cell phone dialects is normal for kids today. If you’re 30 and younger, your world is likely to spin at a faster rate than those of us who are older.

Which brings me back to museums and the question of how we reach new audiences, speak new languages—both literally and symbolically—so museums remain relevant in a rapidly changing world.

Well, this might be a good time to tell you a little about the museum I work in…which is one building in a large cultural complex named Smithsonian Institution.

In 1838, the United States government received money from the estate of a British scientist  named James Smithson—who had never visited America but wrote in his will that he wanted to fund  an Institution for the Increase and Diffusion of Knowledge.

And so, the Smithsonian was born…starting with the Castle building and now containing more than 19 museums in Washington, DC and dozens  of research  facilities around the world.

But despite being the world’s largest complex of museums, I will tell you honestly that the Smithsonian now struggles to redefine its mission, and to reinvent itself.   The world no longer needs a  “Treasure-house of Knowledge” where the ‘information-starved public or a budding researcher” could mail a letter with a question about  any topic and receive ‘state-of-the- art’ information in the form of a scientific publication, booklet or letter.  =

We also served society through our museums and

Today, more than 30 million people visit Smithsonian museums each year—but why and what are they getting from us?

Visitor research tells us very few people ever grasp the meaning of our exhibitions. We fall short of engaging them in meaningful exploration of new ideas.

Is this because the staff doing the work are not fully engaged; because younger visitors bring different expectations—perhaps a combination of these and other factors?

I’m not sure but after nearly 200 years of conducting business as usual—we’re attempting to reinvent ourselves and how we showcase the work we do.

We hired a marketing firm to help us figure out how to communicate our mission to the public. As you might imagine, many curators dislike the results of this effort and our new “seriously amazing” marketing campaign.

Luckily the Smithsonian is not alone on this journey to transform itself. Museums around the world seek to reconnect with their power –the power to engage new audiences in a changing world.

The process of grappling with how museums thrive in a changing world is not without its rewards—many of our colleagues are sharing experiences—both positive and negative.

What bubbles to the surface of this global conversation in seeking the new power of museums?

Is that we ARE shifting our missions and we’ve found strength in doing so.

We’re moving away from “me” thinking to “we” thinking. We’re hiring more diverse staffs and working with local communities so that the work we do reflects a wider view of human experience.

We’re shifting management from status quo to informed risk-taking and shifting communication from suppressing differences to welcoming them.

By changing how museums are governed and managed, we’re expanding the possibilities about how they become the vibrant places we want them to be.

At the heart of this reinvention is the recognition that for museums to survive into the 21st century, they must become places of shared stewardship, inclusion, curiosity and collaboration. This call to action was sounded as far back as 1917, when American museum director John Dana Cotton published his thoughts in “The Gloom of the Museum”. What Cotton noted nearly a century ago has even more potency today—that museums cannot base their success simply on the strength of a collection, size of a staff or number of people who visit.  We must move from a “me” perspective to a “we” perspective, and we must chose objects for their ability to spark society—we call them social objects. Here’s one of the favorites for Smithsonian visitors—the puppet Kermit the frog.

Amazing things happen with the shift from “me” to ‘we’ using social objects.

Objects cease to be simply a destination, they become the process. WE—curators, educators, directors, tour staff—give visitors new ways of seeing and interpreting them. We propose multiple perspectives and give multiple points of entry to our story (slide—women)

We welcome new audiences and stakeholders to the story. Inside the museum, new communities are invited to collaborate;  staff take calculated risks together knowing that they are safe in doing so to accomplish the “we’ mission.

Outside the museum, communities of diverse ethnic, religious and economic backgrounds share a stake in the future. The mood isn’t quite as chaotic as a festival but the spirit it there!

The power of ‘we” in a museum is the power of people.

After all, museums are just buildings and no matter what treasures they might contain, a building is inanimate until people bring it to life.

So museums of the 21st century are places where everyone is welcomed, where exhibitions with real objects offer a delicious alternative to the flatness of the internet; and where staff care as much about why we do something as how we do it.

Museums of the 21st century no longer use a rear-view mirror to glimpse life as it passes by, we are the community and the community is us.

Thanks very much.

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