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Thursday, October 29, 2020
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CATEGORY

Public Lecture

“The last King of Jaffna was a Sinhalese Buddhist” Lecture by H. D. L. Mahindapala 13th February 2017, Royal Asiatic Society of Sri Lanka

History records King Sankilli II as the last Tamil King of Jaffna whose defeat at the hands of the Portuguese in 1619 lead to the annexation of the Kingdom of Jaffna to Portugal. But a closer examination of historical facts proves otherwise. History states that the invasion of Jaffna by King Senerath of Kandy in 1629 as the last battle for the Jaffna Kingdom from which the Portuguese had to wrestle it back.

The Power of Museums

Dr. Karen Lee: Curator from the Smithsonian MuseumThe transcript of the public lecturer deliver by Dr. Karen Lee at the National Museum, Colombo on...

Iron Age (2300+/- 200yrsB.P) Human Settlers of Prehistoric Port City of Adichanallur, Tamil Nadu, India

  All are welcome Iron Age (2300 /- 200yrsB.P) Human Settlers of Prehistoric Port City of Adichanallur, Tamil Nadu, India G. Pathmanathan, Raghavan Pathmanathan and T. Satyomorthy   nleft"...

Digitally recreating ancient Anuradhapura: A case study of Jethavanaramaya

cell phone spy software Digitally recreating ancient Anuradhapura: A case study of Jethavanaramaya By Prasad Samarajiva, Chandima Ambanvala and Anuradha Piyadasa on Monday, 25th APRIL 2011 at...

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Book Review: Anubudhu Mihindu Mahimi – Mihindhu High Priest-The Second Buddha

Anubudhu Mihidhu Mahahimi is a much-awaited biography on the Arahath Mahinda who was instrumental in introducing Buddhism to our island.

Annaikoṭṭai Seal: Is it Tamil Brāhmī? – By Prasad Fonseka

A team of researchers from the Jaffna University launched archaeological excavation of a megalithic burial site at Annaikoṭṭai in Jaffna Peninsula which commenced in 1980. In 1981 the discoverer of a steatite seal with a Brāhmī inscription and some other symbols was a significant milestone. The first attempt to decipher was done by Dr Kartigesu Indrapala of the Jaffna University. His reading was kovetem, which denotes the chief or king. However, overall it was considered as a Tamil Inscription and furthermore a Tamil Brāhmī inscription.

Fortifications and the Landscape: A GIS Inventory and Mapping of Kandyan and Dutch Fortifications in Sri Lanka

Fortifications and the Landscape: A GIS Inventory and Mapping of Kandyan and Dutch Fortifications in Sri Lanka Extended Abstract H.M. Chryshane Mendis Master’s thesis MA Landscape and Heritage...

In loving memory of Dr. Roland Silva, a pillar of Sri Lankan Archaeology

Deshamanya Vidya Jyothi Dr. Roland Silva is one of the foremost Asian experts in the conservation of historical monuments and sites and one of Sri Lanka’s most prominent archaeologists. He was the former Commissioner of Archaeology (1983-1990) and the Founder Director General of the Central Cultural Fund that implemented the UNESCO-Sri Lanka Project of the Cultural Triangle, former Chancellor of the University of Moratuwa, former President of the World Body of Conservators, the first international president of ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites) from Asia (1990-1999) and UNESCO Chair and the founder President of The National Trust Sri Lanka.

New Light on The Decline of Polonnaruwa (1196-1215): The Tamil Pillar Inscription from Rankot Vihara

The Tamil Pillar Inscription at the premises of the Rankot Vihara was discovered during the course of an archaeological survey conducted by the Cultural...
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