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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

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Hunugalagala is a limestone cave situated on the southern slope of the central highlands in Sri Lanka. It is a mighty rock formation that has been formed through million years ago. The surrounding area of this cave had been used by the foraging communities at least 4000 years ago. Grind-stones utilized for cereal processing and elegantly manufactured microlithic stone implements (quartz) are visible on the ground at several locations not far from the cave. Excavation in the Hunugalagala cave was initiated on 27th July 2013 and the archaeological findings are stunning. The artifacts so far unearthed include stone grind stones, painted potsherds (black lines on red background) and human/animal ? bones which are highly calcified. Hunugalagala is the only cave that has been selected for deep archaeological investigations in the history of the archaeology in Sri Lanka. The excavation team headed by Raj Somadeva (PhD), Professor in Archaeology of the Postgraduate Institute of Archaeology in the University of Kelaniya. A Physical Anthropologist and a Geologist with several amateur archaeologists are accompanying the excavation.

 

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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

 

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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

 

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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

 

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Hunugalagala Limestone Cave Excavation 2013

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Dear Sir,
    As you have decided last year to excavate the cave site and started excavation now. Congratulations sir for selecting the deep archaeological investigations at the site. It seems that you and your team is working very hard. I hope the residual analysis of the grinding stone that you have discovered will give us the information related to plant parts used during that time. You may find much more plant material in different forms that will helpfull us to generate the data regarding early farming communities.
    With best regards
    Satish
    Deccan College Pune INDIA.

  2. Dear Sir,
    As you have decided last year to excavate the cave site and started excavation now. Congratulations sir for selecting the deep archaeological investigations at the site. It seems that you and your team is working very hard. I hope the residual analysis of the grinding stone that you have discovered will give us the information related to plant parts used during that time. You may find much more plant material in different forms that will helpfull us to generate the data regarding early farming communities.
    With best regards
    Satish
    Deccan College Pune INDIA.

Comments are closed.

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