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Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Ethno Rock Art: A case study Kaimur, Bihar – Sachin Kumar Tiwary

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By Sachin Kumar Tiwary

Ethno rock art can provide insights of value to Archaeoscientists into how people in the past may have lived, especially with regard to their social structures, religious beliefs and other aspects of their culture”. This way, the methodological approach proposed in this publication can also contribute for the development of Cognitive Archaeology, in particular, and brings, in a general way, important information for future research in the fields of archaeology, anthropology, rock art, ethnography, and symbolism, among others.. The book has three chapters and 103 figures. The present project titled “Ethno Rock Art: A Case Study of Kaimur, Bihar” is a work, which largely depends on field exploration in the study area by the researcher. Inspite of extensive field exploration I have the inspiration from other researchers and scholars who works for advancement of rock art studies in India. Ethno rock art is one of the neglected disciplines of Indian Archaeology. In this work apart from the brief about the rock art of Kaimur, a detail attempt has been made to interpret them taking clue from ethno-archaeological evidences.

 

Cover Page: Ethno Rock Art A case study Kaimur Bihar Sachin Kumar Tiwary
Cover Page: Ethno Rock Art A case study Kaimur Bihar Sachin Kumar Tiwary

The methodology used for the development of project is divided into three phases: data collecting, analysis and information stage. The collection of information started from a wide review of books and articles published on the Kaimurian rock art; researches about the occupants of those territory through the ages and the survey of specific data about their ethno art. As far as the research on rock art of Kaimur region (Bihar) is concerned, unfortunately only two articles are written on this regional rock art. The result of present study has elevated the Kaimur rock art on the national or even international level and I am sure that now the rock art researches from far off regions or nations may now turn to this region as one of the resource centres of filed observation. Although so far, it was more or less in a state of oblivion and regretfully suffered negligence or isolation in such studies.

Preface and Acknowledgement 

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1 COMMENT

  1. Rock art was in fact just a ‘go through’ art without considering it ‘specific’ ‘thoughtfull’ ‘deliberatly drawn’ ‘meaningfull’ art etc. But now it gaining importance and Dr. Sachin Kr. Tiwary’s work on ethno rock art of Kaimur regoin will deffinitely open new vistas in this regard. He has worked on this field very èxostively and has many papers on this issue published in national and international research journals. So we hope for another great, thought-provoking, scholaraly work from his pen. All the Best for Bright Future. Amen.!!!!

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