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Tuesday, October 20, 2020

New Maritime Archaeological discoveries in Eastern Province in Sri Lanka: With special emphasis on Trincomale to Potuvil

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AMA Dayananda and Mahinda Karunarathna, Maritime Archaeology Unit, Central Cultural Fund

Maritime Archaeology Unit (MAU) of Central Cultural Fund (CCF) is carried out an underwater Archaeological non disturbance exploration in the Eastern coastal area (From Trincomalee to Potuvill), 13th of July to 26th of August 2013. Drawing the measured and non measured drawings, photographical and video documentation, applying GPS and remote sensing are the used methods for the exploration.Trincomalee, Batticaloa and Pothuwil are the main selected areas for the survey.

MAU team discovered 16 shipwrecks and other 4 maritime archaeological sites after the survey. Irakkandi wreck at Nialwei, HMS   Diamade wreck at Uppuveli, Trincomalee, Lady Maculum wreck, British Sargent wreck, Pasikuda Iron wreck, Pasikuda Boilaer wreck I & II , Baticaloa Boiler wreck, SS Brunus wreck (Sakkara kappal/ Gragery Wreck),  Kalmune Boiler wreck at baticaloa and Akkaraipattu Boiler wreck, Tirkkovil Boiler wreck, Tirkkovil Iron wreck, Komari Boiler wreck, Omari Boiler wreck at Potuvare uncovered by the survey. The underwater archaeological site at Swami rock at Trincomalee, ancient stone bridge at Mayankerni, old Dutch jetty at, Pasikuda and Buddhist underwater archaeology site at Potuvil are explored and unearthed new information on underwater Archaeology.

History of the wrecks are going back to the Dutch  and British period of Sri Lanka and unearthed all wrecks are sunk in colonized era of Sri Lanka. Most of the wrecks are boiler wreck that built by the iron. An metal anchor and man made stone blocks are found from swami rock and Bow sections, stern , propeller and shaft, boilers, anchors are found from the wreck sites. Most of the wrecks are distorted by the treasure hunters .

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